The Week’s Works: June 7, 2013

historyintheworks:

Welcome to the second edition of The Week’s Works! Every Friday I’ll be wrapping up with the week with recommendations on good reads, songs, movies, photos, and more, so make sure you stay tuned! Here’s a link to The Week’s Works from last Friday.

Your Weekly Reads:

  1. The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined by Steven Parker
    I confess I haven’t gotten through this entire book, but every excerpt I’ve read has piqued my interest, and I’m curious to hear others’ thoughts.  Do you think violence has truly declined in the world today?  I find Parker’s claims interesting, and certainly credible, though I’d love to hear more from others on the topic.
  2. Why Coming Home is Hard,” by Anne Jamison, Thought Catalog
    I especially recommend this poetic piece to college students, 20-something’s, and folks who have been traveling or away from home for a long time.

Your Weekly Tracks:

  1. Miguel - Adorn (Sammy Bananas Remix)
    Miguel brings a lot of talent to the modern R&B scene, and I highly suggest you check out his 2012 album, Kaleidoscope Dream. This remix of his single “Adorn” by Brooklyn DJ Sammy Bananas is my one my personal favorites of 2013 so far.
  2. Phosphorescent: Song For Zula
    Another favorite of the year so far, Phosphorescent delivers some amazing lyrics over a seemingly inventive take on a four-chord song. Quite the bizarre music video as well.

Your Weekly Clips:

  1. Tony Parker’s Buzzer Beater at 120 Frames Per Second
    I haven’t been following the NBA playoffs too closely this year, but it’s hard to ignore what Tony Parker did last night.

Your Weekly Photo:

image
This image has been circulating the web for about a week now, though I can’t seem to find its original source.  If someone knows who took this rather breathtaking photo of the protests in Turkey, please let me know.  Here’s hoping for the safety of all those involved.

(via historyintheworks-deactivated20)

The Week’s Works: May 31, 2013

historyintheworks:

Hey everyone! History in the Works is now proud to present a new addition to the blog entitled “The Week’s Works.”  Every week, I’ll be posting recommendations of articles, books, songs, movies, and more that you should check out.  Here’s the first week’s; let me know your thoughts!

Your Weekly Reads:

  1. Beyonce On Gender Equality, Power, And Who Decides What’s Sexy by Brianna West, Thought Catalog
  2. Why the Boomers are the Most Hated Generation by Edward Tenner, The Atlantic
  3. Drone On by William Satelan, Slate

Your Weekly Tracks:

  1. Blinding (Hybrid Minds Remix) - Jakwob
    Jakwob’s 2012 hit “Blinding” was a mesmerizing blend of reverb heavy pianos and soulful vocals, yet somehow drum and bass duo Hybrid Minds took the song to another level.  Whether you’re driving, working out, studying, or just shooting the breeze, throw this on, ease up the bass, and get lost.
  2. Gun - Emiliana Torrini
    There’s something undeniably cool about this song. An addictive guitar riff, an ominous buildup, Emiliana Torrini’s haunting vocals, and poetic lyrics depicting - well listen, and find out.  I first heard this on the BBC show Luther, starring Idris Elba, and have been hooked to Torrini ever since; the rest of her 2008 album, Me and Armini, is worth checking out.

Your Weekly Movie:

Eastern Promises (2007)
image

If you haven’t seen this one yet, I highly recommend watching.  Viggo Mortensen plays a driver for the Russian mob in London as Naomi Watts plays a midwife intrigued by the diary of a dead woman, and a modern crime noir ensues. Eastern Promises should be remembered for some fascinating performances by a great cast, but the movie is properly rated “R” for some brutally violent sequences.

Your Weekly Photo:

image

A triangular alignment of planets over Lake Huron, gorgeously captured in orange and blue gradients.  Source: kami77 on reddit.

(via historyintheworks-deactivated20)

ourpresidents:

President John F. Kennedy was born on this day in 1917—


Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, made the following entry on a notecard, when her second child was born: 

John Fitzgerald Kennedy 
Born Brookline, Mass. (83 Beals Street) May 29, 1917 

In all, Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy would have nine children, four boys and five girls. She kept notecards for each of them in a small wooden file box and made a point of writing down everything from a doctor’s visit to the shoe size they had at a particular age.

John Fitzgerald Kennedy was named in honor of Rose’s father, John Francis Fitzgerald, the Boston Mayor popularly known as Honey Fitz. Before long, family and friends called this small blue-eyed baby Jack. Read More

Photos: Senator John F. Kennedy in his Senate Office.  August, 1959; Rose Kennedy and her children, circa 1923. L-R: Rose Kennedy, Eunice Kennedy, Kathleen Kennedy, Rosemary Kennedy (seated in foreground), John F. Kennedy, and Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. 

-from the JFK Library

(via pbsthisdayinhistory)

shihlun:

In honor of Karl Marx’s 195th birthday, artist Ottmar Hörl placed 500 statues of the bearded thinker throughout his hometown of Tier, Germany. The miniature Marx men were all the same size and shape, yet all cast in different shades of red.

Happy birthday, Karl Marx!

(via oldenough2burmom)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

May 6, 1856: Sigmund Freud is Born

On this day in 1856, the father of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud, was born in the present-day Czech Republic.

Freud explored topics such as child sexuality and libido as well as dream interpretations. He believed that neuroses were derived from past traumatic experiences and in order to lessen the neurotic behavior, one had to remember the event and analyze it. Unlike others, Freud argued that neuroses resulted from previous sexual events. 

After reviewing his work and theories, Freud published The Interpretation of Dreams, The Psychopathology of Everyday Life and Three Essays on Theory of Sexuality. To this day, Freud’s work is constantly debated and criticized, but continues to influence the world of psychology.

Keep learning about Freud with this biographical essay

Image: Freud at work in his study 1938, Freud with sons Ernst and Martin 1916, Freud at a psychoanalytic congress in The Hague 1920 (Library of Congress)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

May 3, 1469: Niccolò Machiavelli is Born
On this day in 1469, Italian writer, philosopher, and politician, Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli was born in Florence, Italy. At the age of 29, Machiavelli served as a defense secretary for Florence.
In 1513, Machiavelli released his work, The Prince, where he described the important characteristics of a leader. Machiavelli suggests to rulers that in order to reign effectively, they may have to use their power unethically.  In this work, he coined the phrase “the end justifies the means.”
Due to his tyrannical beliefs and practices, people use the word “Machiavellian” to refer to someone who is very cunning and unscrupulous.
Learn more about Machiavelli with Medici: Godfathers of the Renaissance.
Image: Portrait of Machiavelli by Santi di Tito

pbsthisdayinhistory:

May 3, 1469: Niccolò Machiavelli is Born

On this day in 1469, Italian writer, philosopher, and politician, Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli was born in Florence, Italy. At the age of 29, Machiavelli served as a defense secretary for Florence.

In 1513, Machiavelli released his work, The Prince, where he described the important characteristics of a leader. Machiavelli suggests to rulers that in order to reign effectively, they may have to use their power unethically.  In this work, he coined the phrase “the end justifies the means.”

Due to his tyrannical beliefs and practices, people use the word “Machiavellian” to refer to someone who is very cunning and unscrupulous.

Learn more about Machiavelli with Medici: Godfathers of the Renaissance.

Image: Portrait of Machiavelli by Santi di Tito

ourpresidents:

This week marks the birthday of Duke Ellington.  The American composer, pianist, and big band maverick was born on April 29, 1899 in Washington, D.C.  
This photograph was taken on his seventieth birthday in 1969, when Ellington received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Nixon in the East Room of the White House. 
-from the Nixon Library

Happy belated birthday, Duke Ellington!

ourpresidents:

This week marks the birthday of Duke Ellington.  The American composer, pianist, and big band maverick was born on April 29, 1899 in Washington, D.C. 

This photograph was taken on his seventieth birthday in 1969, when Ellington received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Nixon in the East Room of the White House. 

-from the Nixon Library

Happy belated birthday, Duke Ellington!

April 29, 1863: Happy Birthday, William Randolph Hearst.

On this day in 1863, newspaper publisher and media mogul William Randolph Hearst was born in San Francisco.    His family was extremely wealthy and influential; his father had become a millionaire through mining exploits and served in the United States Senate from 1886 to 1891.

After being expelled from Harvard for a series of drunken antics, Hearst began managing the San Francisco Chronicle, publishing the works of Mark Twain, Ambrose Pierce, and other famous American writers of the day.  Many of his stories attacked companies Hearst saw as corrupt, though these same companies were most often rivals to his family’s interests.  In 1895, he bought the New York Journal and engaged in a publishing war with Joseph Pulitzer over a variety of issues, including the Spanish-American War.  This newspaper fight is often credited with beginning the modern media tactic of “yellow journalism.”

Over the next thirty years, Hearst expanded and bought over twenty eight national newspapers, as well as news services, radio stations, and magazines.  He also bought mining, ranching, and timber companies to further expand and control his wealth.  Using his influence, Hearst served as a Democratic Congressman from New York from 1903 to 1907. He lost every subsequent election thereafter, but retained a political presence for the remainder of his life.

Heart’s influence on political opinion through his news outlets was definitive.  He was the lone print supporter of William Jennings Bryan in 1896.  In the early 1900s, he pushed aggressively to make marijuana illegal, a move many have said was done to protect his interests in the timber industry from the growing use of hemp.  He also lobbied relentlessly for Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s election in 1932, and proved to be a major supporter of the New Deal in the following years.  In 1941, Orson Welles released his magnum opus, Citizen Kane, which he admits was based on Hearst’s life.  Hearst died in Beverly Hills on August 14, 1951, at the age of 88.

todaysdocument:

William Randolph Hearst—newspaper magnate and congressman—born 150 years ago today.  Cartoonist Clifford Berryman depicts the multimillionaire as trying to pass himself as a man of the people during a possible presidential run.
congressarchives:

Newspaper publisher and multi-millionaire William Randolph Hearst was viewed as a strong candidate for the Democratic nomination for President in 1908. This illustration entitled, “Hearst’s New Make-up”, by cartoonist Clifford Berryman, appeared in the Washington Evening Star on June 5, 1907 and shows Hearst attempting to convince the common man that he is their friend. Hearst was born on April 29, 1863. 
Hearst’s New Make-up by Clifford Berryman, 6/5/1907, U.S. Senate Collection (ARC 6010707)


Happy birthday, William Randolph Hearst!

todaysdocument:

William Randolph Hearst—newspaper magnate and congressman—born 150 years ago today.  Cartoonist Clifford Berryman depicts the multimillionaire as trying to pass himself as a man of the people during a possible presidential run.

congressarchives:

Newspaper publisher and multi-millionaire William Randolph Hearst was viewed as a strong candidate for the Democratic nomination for President in 1908. This illustration entitled, “Hearst’s New Make-up”, by cartoonist Clifford Berryman, appeared in the Washington Evening Star on June 5, 1907 and shows Hearst attempting to convince the common man that he is their friend. Hearst was born on April 29, 1863. 

Hearst’s New Make-up by Clifford Berryman, 6/5/1907, U.S. Senate Collection (ARC 6010707)


Happy birthday, William Randolph Hearst!

(via pbsthisdayinhistory)

unhistorical:

Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-ta: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate to tap, at three, on the teeth. Lo. Lee. Ta. She was Lo, plain Lo, in the morning, standing four feet ten in one sock. She was Lola in slacks. She was Dolly at school. She was Dolores on the dotted line. But in my arms she was always Lolita.

April 22, 1899: Vladimir Nabokov is born.

Vladimir Nabokov was born in Saint Petersburg and wrote many of his novels (including his earliest nine) in Russian, but his most famous work, the controversial classic Lolitawas written in English. Nabokov was born to an aristocratic Russian statesman (killed in 1922 by monarchist assassins) and his wife; the Nabokovs enjoyed a cushy and privileged lifestyle in St. Petersburg until 1919, when they were forced into exile in Western Europe. There, Nabokov studied at Cambridge, wrote short stories and poetry under a pseudonym, and composed his first major work in English - The Real Life of Sebastian Knight, shortly before he and his family (including his Jewish wife, Vera Nabokov née Slonim) fled to the United States from France in 1940 with the onset of the German invasion of France.

In the U.S., Nabokov worked at a number of institutions (New York’s Museum of Natural History, Stanford, Wellesley, Harvard, and Cornell) teaching in a number of different fields (entomology, creative writing, comparative literature, Russian, and Russian and European literature). In addition to his fiction writing, Nabokov was also an accomplished literary critic, chess problemist, and entomologist - in fact, he wrote his most famous novel while studying butterflies in the Rocky Mountains. Lolita and Pale Fire (1962) were ranked fourth and fifty-third on the Modern Library’s 100 Best Novels List, respectively. 

Happy birthday, Vladimir Nabokov!

whitecolonialism:

April 21, 1838: Naturalist John Muir is Born. 

John Muir, the famed dedicated advocate for the protection of American wild lands, is born in Dunbar, Scotland. 

“The clearest way into the universe is through a wilderness.” 

Happy birthday, John Muir!

April 20, 1889: Happy Birthday, Adolf Hitler!

(The authors of this blog wish it to be known that they do not, in fact, wish Hitler a happy birthday.)

Hitler was born in Braunau am Inn, an Austrian village on the border with Germany. As a child, Hitler sang in the church choir and had considered becoming a priest. In 1900, his younger brother died, and Hitler became withdrawn and difficult in school. His father died in 1903, and Hitler permanently withdrew from school in 1905 at the age of 16. Hitler then began to live by himself in Vienna, where he took up painting, and attempted to attend the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna. (He was rejected twice, in 1907 and 1908.) His mother, who had been financially supporting him, died in December of 1907, and by 1909 Hitler was living in a homeless shelter. Vienna was ripe with religious and racial prejudices, with widespread fears of being overrun by immigrants. It is believed that this is the origins of Hitlers antisemitism.

Hitler served in World War I as an Austrian in the Bavarian Army, and was  As the German war effort fell apart, Hitler came to believe that they had been betrayed at home by the Marxists and civilian leaders.

In 1919, Hitler joined the German Worker’s Party, which was later renamed to the National Socialist German Workers Party. In 1923, Hitler and other socialist revolutionaries stormed a public meeting, and eventually marched on the Bavarian War Ministry. He was arrested shortly after for high treason, and while he was sentenced to five years jail-time, he was released after a year. It is during this time that he wrote his autobiography, Mein Kampf, in which he outlined his ideal for a racially unified Germany.

Upon his release from prison, Hitler ran for German president. He lost his first race in 1932, but garnered 35% of the vote. In 1933, after losing the presidential election to Paul von Hindeburg, Hitler was appointed chancellor. He used violent protests by the opposition to suppress civil and political rights. In August, 1934, President von Hindenburg died, allowing Hitler to consolidate power and become the sole head of state of Germany.

Hitler began to re-militarize Germany, against the provisions of the Treaty of Versailles that ended World War I, and occupied the Rhineland in 1936. In 1938, Hitler ended Germany’s alliance with China, and instead allied with Japan. After annexing various regions of Austria and Czechoslovakia, Hitler invaded Poland on September 1, 1939, which prompted France and Britain to declare war on Germany on September 3, starting World War II.

As the tide of war turned against Germany by 1945, Hitler and his wife Eva Braun committed suicide on May 30, 1945.

Hitler saw the Jewish people as the enemy of the German state. By 1942, after years of political and social persecution of Jews, he had officially decided to kill all Jews, Slavs, and other undesirables. Hitler’s “Final Solution” resulted in the death of 11 million people; 2-3 million Jews, 2 million Poles, 3 million Soviet prisoners of war, and others, including communists, homosexuals, and the mentally disabled.

April 19, 1978: Happy 35th Birthday, James Franco!

James Franco was born in Palo Alto, California, and his first professional acting role was in a Pizza Hut commercial in 1997, after having recently dropped out of UCLA in the middle of his freshman year. In 1999 Franco was cast in NBC’s Freaks and Geeks, alongside Seth Rogen and Jason Segel. The show was cancelled after one season, but has since developed a cult following.

Franco portrayed 1950s bad-boy James Dean in a TV biographical film in 2001, for which he won a Golden Globe Award. Franco immersed himself in the role, cutting off contact with his family and girlfriend, and taking up smoking cigarettes. (Previously not a smoker, Franco began to smoke two packs a day.)

In 2002 Franco was cast as Harry Osborn in Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man, and also starred in the two sequels (2004, 2007). Franco was also nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor in 2010 for his portrayal of Aron Ralston in 127 Hours. (Despite his penchant for commitment to a role, Franco thankfully did not actually cut off his arm for this movie.)

Franco re-enrolled in UCLA in 2006, and received an undergraduate degree in English in 2009 with a GPA of 3.5. (Franco received permission to take 62 credit hours a semester, although this author can not confirm how many credits Mr. Franco actually enrolled in.) In 2010 he received a Masters of Fine Arts from Columbia University’s writing program, and is currently pursuing his PhD in English at Yale University.

Franco has taught a class at New York University in filmmaking and production, and began teaching a course at UCLA earlier this year. He is also an adjunct professor of English at UCLA.

April 17, 1837: Happy Birthday, J.P. Morgan

On this day in 1837, American banker and global financier John Pierpont “J.P.” Morgan was born in Hartford, Connecticut to a wealthy banking family.  Growing up, he attended the English High School of Boston and schools in Switzerland and Germany.  His first foray into banking came in 1857 at his father’s firm in London, though he later partnered with Anthony Drexel, founder of Drexel University in Philadelphia, to create the firm, Drexel, Morgan, and Company.

Morgan earned his real fame in the 1890s, during an era of completely unrestricted capitalism and monolithic robber barons.  Upon his father’s death in 1890 and Drexel’s passing in 1893, Morgan consolidated power as the sole head of his firm, now rechristened “J.P. Morgan & Company.”  In the wake of the Panic of 1893, the worst depression the United States had seen in its history until then, Morgan loaned the United States Treasury $17.5 million in gold, an event that fractured the Democratic Party between pro-gold, conservative supporters of Grover Cleveland and pro-silver, agrarian supporters of William Jennings Bryan. Ultimately, the move mainly proved symbolic of Morgan’s growing power.

Morgan was also notorious for consolidating large powerful corporations into monopolistic super-corporations. Most famously, he oversaw the merging Thomas Edison’s Edison General Electric with the Thomas-Houston Electric Company to form General Electric in 1892, and merging the Federal Steel Company (of which he financed the creation of), the Carnegie Steel Company, and the National Steel Company to form the United States Steel Corporation in 1901.  In 1896, he also financed Adolph Simon Och’s purchase of the near bankrupt New York Times, and the two turned the entire newspaper around.

J.P. Morgan also oversaw the banking coalition in 1907 after another recession threatened the survival of the U.S. economy. Morgan, along with his powerful friends, rerouted the money between the banks and their troubled assets to stop the crisis from worsening, and ultimately supported the creation of the Federal Reserve as a mechanism to protect against future economic catastrophes.  This support was given, however, in exchange for silence toward U.S. Steel’s clear violation of antitrust laws.

J.P. Morgan grew old peacefully, bequeathing his company to his son, J.P. Morgan, Jr., and donating vast amounts of his fortune to the arts and other public projects. He died quietly in his sleep on March 31, 1913, while travelling in Italy.  At the time of his death, Morgan held an estimated $68.3 million (roughly $25.2 billion in today’s dollars), which equated to roughly 19% of his entire net worth.

Like many of the capitalists of his day, Morgan lived in extreme splendor at the expense of many. He owned an island off the coast of Long Island, where he built a lavish summer home.  He collected yachts, one of which, the Corsair, was sold to the U.S. government and modified into a warship in the Spanish-American War.  Morgan also collected over 1,000 gemstones, and became such an avid enthusiast of precious metals that a gemstone discovered in 1913 by George Frederick Kunz was named “Morganite.”  Much of Morgan’s collections of books, paintings, and other pieces of art has been donated to the Metropolitan Museum of Art (of which he helped found and served as President), the American Museum of Natural History, Harvard University, and his own institution, the Pierpont Morgan Library in New York.

Between 1890 and 1913, J.P. Morgan and Company controlled and financed 42 corporations, among which include: American Telephone and Telegraph (AT&T), U.S. Steel, General Electric, and a swath of major railroad companies running from New York to Chicago to the West Coast.  Today, many of these companies still operate on a global scale.  J.P. Morgan-Chase owns 2.5 trillion in assets (roughly 19% of the United States’ GDP) and has caused controversy by engaging in risky financial tricks and most recently, losing seven billion dollars in faulty derivatives trades.  In a sense, the bank echoes Morgan’s legacy: one of global domination through corporate finance and an expansive, paternalistic view of the rest of society.

April 17, 1959: Happy Birthday, Sean Bean!

On this day in 1959, actor Shaun Mark Bean was born in Sheffield, West Riding of Yorkshire, England.  Growing up, Bean moved from school to school before ultimately pursuing acting at Rotherham College and subsequently the Royal Academy of the Dramatic Arts (RADA) in London.  He graduated from RADA in 1983 and moved to the stage, adopting the Irish spelling of his name - “Sean Bean” - as his stage name.

Bean first garnered national attention in 1984 with a rather humorous ad for non-alcoholic Barbican Lager.  He later joined the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1986 and played a variety of roles.  Bean made his first foray into film in 1986 with Derek Jarman’s Carvaggio and two years later with Jarman’s War Requiem.  By the early 90s, Bean became a household name on British television in BBC shows such as Clarissa and Sharpe. These roles heightened Bean’s sex appeal among British audiences, priming him for even larger fame.

In 1992, Bean played an IRA terrorist opposite Harrison Ford in the Hollywood blockbuster Patriot Games.  During filming, Ford injured Bean with a boat hook, leaving a permanent scar that would ultimately typecast him as a perfect Hollywood villain.  Over the  next two decades he played the villain in Goldeneye, Ronin, Essex Boys, Don’t Say A Word, National Treasure, The Island, and Far North.  Included in most of these roles was a grisly death scene, leading to the motif that Sean Bean dies in all of his roles.

Though he has often played a Hollywood villain, Bean is most recognizable for his role as Boromir in The Lord of the Rings trilogy, and as Ned Stark in HBO’s Game of Thrones.  He has also appeared in Equilibirum, Troy, Percy Jackson & The Olympians, and The Black Death, as well as various other films and plays.

Sean Bean has won multiple awards for his wide variety of roles, but is perhaps best remembered as “that actor who just seems to die in everything.”  The attached video might explain.  Warning: many, many spoilers!